Color Play – an international conversation of quilts from PIQF 2012

The Pacific International Quilt festival always includes a wonderful array of quilts and I really enjoyed this year’s selections.

Each year my favorite exhibit is the International Entries of the World Quilt Competition, a collection of quilts made in many different countries

I went to this part of the show first because it always offers a wonderful variety of style, design and color.

Unfortunately, the lighting at the venue is very poor for a quilt show. It has very high overhead lights that shine right in your eyes whenever you try to look at the work. (and makes your neck hurt, too!) Even so, my photographs captured some of the vibrant and exciting colors on display this year. (Much better than my iPhone photos of last year!)

When I’m photographing a quilt show I take a photo of the whole quilt, a close up, and one of the card displayed with the quilt so that I have details about the work for future reference. (And so I can share what the quilt makers say with you, my dear readers.) I’m sorry to say that I didn’t photograph this quilt’s card, so I can’t share the information with you. If you do know who made this amazing work please let me know in the comments section!

As I was organizing this photograph for the blog I noticed the letters above each colored section. They spell out TSAB – I wonder what that’s all about. I didn’t see them until I posted the photo!

The way the strip sets are sewn and the raw-edge flaps and the color movement is all very intriguing.
The cut away section of the circles is really wonderful, too!

Seams on the Surface; by Norma Keeley
Seams on the Surface; by Norma Keeley

It is almost like there is a conversation going on with the first quilt and Norma Keeley’s work shown here, both quiltmakers are using raw edges and flaps sewn into the quilts to make interesting statements. I like this approach and I think both of these quilts are very successful in engaging the viewer.

detail of Seams on the Surface; by Norma Keeley
detail of Seams on the Surface; by Norma Keeley

I also really like how the stitching and beading in Keeley’s work (above) add additional layers of visual play.

Twilight, by Orna Shahar
Twilight, by Orna Shahar

Orna Shahar’s Twilight seems to be another addition to the conversation being played out in these vertical stripe-set quilts. This work includes fabric with embroidered stitches and other textural elements, yet in this case the colors are of a more limited palette.

detail of Twilight, by Orna Shahar
detail of Twilight, by Orna Shahar

This year’s show was a virtual panoply of stitching – I have never seen so many quilts with such tight and intricate quilting.

In the Box, by Rita Hutchens
In the Box, by Rita Hutchens

That being said, I think Rita Hutchens’ Tube Stitch Fractal Quilts are an amazing combination of color, design and stitching. She reports that she made these quilts (and quilted them) on a home sewing machine – this fact just blows me away!

detail of In the Box, by Rita Hutchens
detail of In the Box, by Rita Hutchens

Ziggity Dooh Dah, by Rita Hutchens
Ziggity Dooh Dah, by Rita Hutchens
detail of Ziggity Dooh Dah, by Rita Hutchens
detail of Ziggity Dooh Dah, by Rita Hutchens

Another quilt that really intrigued me was this applique piece made by Rachel Covo from Israel.

A Village in the Galilee, by Rachel Covo
A Village in the Galilee, by Rachel Covo

The strips of landscape from the sky to the water, with the building in between is also a variation of the layering conversation.

Flight of Fancy, by Susan Wessels
Flight of Fancy, by Susan Wessels

Turning our layers on the side and swirling them around the floral fabrics, Susan Wessels’ Flight of Fancy is a jubilant display of color and texture.

detail of Flight of Fancy, by Susan Wessels
detail of Flight of Fancy, by Susan Wessels

I love what she wrote about this improvisational work (below).

The Hues of Amber, by Karlyn Lohrenz
The Hues of Amber, by Karlyn Lohrenz

The delightful monochromatic Hues of Amber is a visual feast of color, design and texture. From our very own Billings, Montana, Karlyn Lohrenz has created a Vitamin D-filled masterpiece.

Detail of The Hues of Amber, by Karlyn Lohrenz
Detail of The Hues of Amber, by Karlyn Lohrenz

The quilting was as intense and exciting as the design!

The Springing Point, by Christel Pietschmann
The Springing Point, by Christel Pietschmann

Some of you will remember when I wrote about circle quilts last year. This fabulous quilt  is a tour de force from Germany’s Christel Pietschmann

detail of The Springing Point, by Christel Pietschmann
detail of The Springing Point, by Christel Pietschmann

The colors are amazing and the simplicity of the design is sublime.

And last but not least is this spiderweb quilt from New Zealand. The funny thing is that I had already found this quilt on Pintrest and put it on my Yummy Quilts board!

Millefiori, by Chris Kenna
Millefiori, by Chris Kenna

My photo shows the colors in this quilt so much better than on Pintrest!

I’ve really been wanting to make a spiderweb quilt and this really inspires me.

You might know Chris Kenna’s work called Green Fire. I had seen it in last year’s PIQF, but I didn’t get a useable photo of it, but take a peek at the close up!

Detail of Chris Kenna's Green Fire
Detail of Chris Kenna’s Green Fire

You can read more about the Green Fire quilt on Tanya Brown’s Blog.

detail of Millefiori, by Chris Kenna
detail of Millefiori, by Chris Kenna

Oh the fabrics and colors in this quilt… I’m in love!

I wonder what the conversation will be next year.

What will you add?

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7 thoughts on “Color Play – an international conversation of quilts from PIQF 2012

    1. Susan! You found my post! I’m so glad. To tell the truth you’re quilt was my FAVORITE in the show – sorry everyone else!
      I just love the color, shape, whimsy. I can tell you enjoyed making it.
      I hope to see more your work in the future!

  1. Another gorgeous display and it’s wonderful to have this opportunity to see quilts that I love but wouldn’t have come across otherwise. Thanks so much for this chance to have a peek, through your photographs!

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