Tag Archives: margaret linderman

Margaret’s Muse – The Frida Quilt

 

Margaret's Muse Quilt Center. Frida Kahlo

Margaret’s Muse Quilt Center. Frida Kahlo

It was a dark and stormy night…

And we decided to make a birthday quilt for our friend, mentor and teacher Margaret Linderman.

And we decided to make it a surprise!

And we wanted all of her peeps to be able to create a part of the quilt.

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I thought of the French Roses quilt, created by Heather French.  It is a versatile, layered, fabric flower that Margaret and her students have made many times for many people.

I drew up a layout with the blocks on point that would have 50 flowers – enough to include many friends!

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Then I added in a center that could have an image of Margaret’s muse, Frida Kahlo, in a flaming corazon.

Margaret’s daughter Janis Stob and I sent out packets of background fabric, a black shadow for each flower (to add a visual punch) and inspiration appliques. It will surprise none of you that I have quite a collection of Alexander Henry fabrics from which to draw folklorico inspiration!

When the blocks came in we gathered at Wooden Gate Quilts, in Danville, and worked on a layout.

The crew working on the layout

The crew working on the layout

 

Jamie in the center

Jamie in the center

Janis sewed the blocks all together, making many extra where we needed more, leaving the hole in the middle for Frida.

Quilt center in progress

Quilt center in progress

I created a heart from dupioni silk and cut flames out of bright batiks. Margaret’s favorite image of Frida Kahlo was printed on to fabric to adorn the center.

Raw-edge appliqes with black batting

Raw-edge appliqes with black batting

To make an exciting edge to the heart I glued lots of small flower appliques to a layer of black batting which would add dimension, color and texture. I stitched them all on the longarm and cut them out with the black shadows visible.

Center in Progress. Adding appliques and a frame

Center in Progress. Adding appliques and a frame

The appliques surrounded the corazon and then I created a frame for the photo of Frida.

Border corazon

Border corazon

The outer “border” was composed of more corazons, most made by Janis Stob and Kathy August.
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The quilt began to take shape!

Of course, even though we started MONTHS in advance, the quilt didn’t get on to the longarm until the DAY BEFORE THE PARTY.  And we still had to add bling and bind it!IMG_6486

I had a marathon 6 hours on the longarm to get it all quilted!

Late night bling crew!

Late night bling crew!

That night we had a bling and binding party! You won’t believe how fast Pat DeForce got that binding on for us!

Frida Flower

Frida Flower

We added crystals, beads, do-dads, bobbles, milagros and anything else we got our hands on to make the quilt more “Margaret!”

Margaret's Muse quilt center

Margaret’s Muse quilt center

The next day we threw her a surprise party!

Please hold for Part 2, wherein we give Margaret the quilt!

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Look for our quilt at Pacific International Quilt Festival in Santa Clara, California, this weekend!


Fabulous Floral Quilts – Old and New

Detail of Laura Fraga's Little Brown Bird quilt - incomprable!

Detail of Laura Fraga’s Little Brown Bird quilt – incomparable!

If you haven’t gotten down to the Museum of the San Ramon Valley in Danville to see the Quintessential Quilts – a Floral Fantasy show, you still have ten days to hustle down there.  I’ve worked with the museum volunteers to create a really beautiful collection of quilts which showcase flowers. We were able to gather quilts with flower appliques, flower fabrics, painted flowers, embroidered, embellished and everything in between!

We have fresh flowers delivered twice a week, compliments of our local floral businesses, gardening groups and stores. The rooms smell lovely and it’s a delightful little exhibit.

"Adam" in the Man Cave at the San Ramon Valley museum

“Adam” in the Man Cave at the San Ramon Valley museum

We’ve also been able to include some very interesting men’s quilts in the “man cave.” We wanted to be sure everyone know men quilt, too. Even if they don’t do loads of floral quilts!

My teacher Margaret Linderman and I will be doing a free demonstration and our raw-edge floral work on Saturday, September 28 from 11:00 to 12:00.  Come early to get parking. The farmer’s market is going on at the same time and it’s a bit of a busy corner of the world!

The 1850 Whig Rose quilt and vintage friends

The 1850 Whig Rose quilt and vintage friends

Jennifer Rounds' Zen Roses next to vintage quilts

Jennifer Rounds’ Zen Roses next to vintage quilts

Wonderful wall hangings and wearable art

Wonderful wall hangings and wearable art

Wonderful vintage doll and Sunbonnet Sue corner

Wonderful vintage doll and Sunbonnet Sue corner

Be sure to come by Saturday, September 21, to see the lovely Sandra Newman demonstrate hand sewing hexagons. She’s created some packets for everyone to try them out and then you can see her beautiful work, too! Also from 11:00 to 12:00.

New York Beauty detail, photo from Pati Freid

New York Beauty detail, photo from Pati Freid

This week I was delighted to read a blog post about the New York Beauty quilts and the San Jose Museum of Quilts and Textile’s current exhibition.

Take a minute to go over to the wonderful blog, See How We Sew, and read Pati Fried’s interesting views on these quintessential American quilts! http://seehowwesew.wordpress.com/2013/09/17/new-york-beauty-quilts-finding-inspiration-in-our-past/

Detail of Pickle Dish-Ish, by Alethea Ballard; 2013

Detail of Pickle Dish-Ish, by Alethea Ballard; 2013

I’ve always loved the New York Beauty quilt design and perhaps need to make one soon in my new quilted applique quilt series!


Quilt Season – The Quirkology of Quilts, Part 1

Quirkology in action!

Quirkology in action!

The Quirkology of Quilts was a quilt show held at the Ran Ramon Valley Museum in September, 2011

I was very happy to be co-curator along with my mentor and friend Margaret Linderman.

We were asked to collect the quilts for the show and we ultimately chose quilts that we really liked and that we felt had enough quirk to make them a happy collection.

We attended planning meetings, collected the quilts, and collated the descriptions from the quilters. We gathered small collections of interesting sewing-related notions, created displays, and wrote text to accompany them. AND then the big day came and we hung the show!

I have to say that I really enjoyed this part of the process the most. We had an eager team of volunteers, ranging in age from 18 to 78, and they were all there to “Make it work, people!”

The quilts went up surprisingly easily, using a hanging system created by one of the clever museum people. I focused on having each quilt “talking” to its neighbor quilts and also to the quilts across, behind and beyond them. I was delighted at the results and was delighted to see how great everything looked!

We had a main quilt room where we hung 15 quilts down the center. Two antique sewing machines stood sentry down the center, and reminded us of how far we’ve come since the days of the treadle machine.

The main room

The main room

We had a case at the far end with framed chair quilts. I am proud to say that the quilt in the center of the case was made by my niece Lucia and was given to me as a gift. Lucia was six years old when she made it this summer. It is her third (but by no means last) chair quilt! The case also included Te Amo Chair, which was made by my sister-in-law, Alethea G. See the Te Amo Chair blog post.

Dream Chair Case

Dream Chair Case

You can also see some of my small, painted and framed chair quilts.

Lombard Street Quilts

Lombard Street Quilts

Everyone who came to the show had a different favorite, but no one passed these two quilts depicting Lombard Street in San Francisco without stopping and admiring the amazing work. Susan Lane’s quilt on the left is just wonderful to see in person, and next to Cyndy Rymer’s Sunset on Lombard quilt they were a great visual pair.

Lombard Street, by Susan Lane; 2010

Lombard Street, by Susan Lane; 2010

Detail of Susan Lane's Lombard Street Quilt

Detail of Susan Lane's Lombard Street Quilt

Susan made her quilt using a variety of methods, including fused and raw-edge applique, painting and texture magic, over a span of 2,000 hours!

Cyndy has made a pattern and a kit with all the fabric for her quilt Sunset on Lombard, including a fabric applique of the cable car at the top of the quilt. Contact Wooden Gate Quilts if you would like to make one of your own!

Chair Quilts

Chair Quilts

Two Mexico-inspired dream chairs hung side by side showed off the colors and images that have inspired so much of my work of late. Sandy Jorgenson’s Lady of Guadalupe Celebrates the Day of the Dead on the left and Margaret Linderman’s Frida and Diego – a Dream on the right, were a visual feast!

Two quilts by Renee Steinpress

Two quilts by Renee Steinpress

One of the most exciting things about the central floor area was the juxtaposition of these two circle-themed quilts made by Renee Steinpress. Eurythmia (left) was created using a yard of fabric that Renee painted using Procion MX dye. It is featured in Christine Barnes book, The Color Club, C & T Publishing, 2010.

Tail Chase, by Renee Steinpress; 2011

Tail Chase, by Renee Steinpress; 2011

Tail Chase, seen in the center of the photo, is Renee’s newest work. She used an improvisational design process to develop the quilt and used Dale Fleming’s 6-minute circle method for the creation of the motifs. People were really impressed by this amazing piece.

I love how it looked with the Eurythmia quilt in the foreground and Margaret Linderman’s Alligator Teeth at the far right.

Through the door - A Wonderful Quilt Conversation

Through the door - A Wonderful Quilt Conversation

My Geisha Landscape from Maverick Quilts on the left was a nice partner next to Renee’s quilt, too.

Stay tuned, there is more to come about this wonderful show…


Let the Quirk Begin…

Koi Pond Chairs, by Alethea Ballard (detail)

Koi Pond Chairs, by Alethea Ballard (detail)

(Read all the way to grumpy cat and the P.S. to be eligible to win a prize. Really.)

There is a very special quilt event beginning on Thursday. The San Ramon Valley Museum in Danville, California, is opening a month-long quilt exhibit.

It is called the Quirkology of Quilts – Warmth to Whimsy.

Margaret Linderman and I were asked to co-curate the biennial quilt show for the museum, which is housed in the historic railroad building at the corner of Railroad Avenue and Prospect.

We have collected an eclectic mix of new quilt work, mostly created by local quilters. Margaret and I both have some of our newest quilts included. In addition, Margaret has selected some of her wearable art clothing to display, and I have some of my small chairs on display.

One of the wonderful things about creating a show like this is that during the selection process you can create a body of work that tells a story, as the quilts relate to each other in interesting ways.

As part of this conversation we have also created displays of old and new sewing tools, pincushions, and a few hand-made monsters. There is an interesting photo collection depicting some of the influences on today’s more quirky quilts. The museum has several fascinating antique quilts that we were able to include, along with a very unusual “Maverick” quilt from the 1960’s.

I invite all of you to visit the show, which will run until September 25. For more information and hours, please visit the museum’s website. http://www.museumsrv.org

Official Quirkology of Quilts flyer

Official Quirkology of Quilts flyer

But wait, you also get…

There are two quilts that you can win for your very own selfiepoo.  There is a raffle quilt; the tickets will be on sale at the museum. (photo coming soon)

Shibori Bouquet, by Margaret Linderman

Shibori Bouquet, by Margaret Linderman

The above quilt, made my Margaret Linderman, will be the prize for the Quilt Treasure Hunt. To win this beautiful quilt, you can pick up a postcard that lists the location of seven quilts, each of which are hanging in a Danville business within walking distance of the museum. Fill out the postcard when you have discovered all of the quilts’ locations and turn it in to the museum to be eligible for a drawing of this lovely wall hanging. Eat, shop, win a quilt – awesome!

But Wait You Also, Also Get a BIG Hello!

I would like to extend a special welcome to those of you who are visiting my blog for the first time! You might be visiting me after reading Laura Nownes’ blog, See How We Sew. It is a delight to be interviewed by Laura for her blog. I hope you like the free project that I shared, which shows the steps to make a portable ironing board using empty fabric bolts.

I invite you to scroll through my blog posts. I write about my current work, things that inspire me, quilts I like, and about my greatest passion – fabric!

Mavis Quinn (again)

Mavis Quinn (again)

A strange person called Mavis Quinn sometimes uses my site to post her ramblings written for Where Cuckoo Women Create Magazine .com.org.biz. Take what she says with a grain (or pound) of salt!

To get you exploring the site, I would like to offer you an opportunity to win a special prize – I will make a wonderful tote bag and put an image from my newest painted quilt, Koi Pond Chairs, on it just for you!

To win the cool tote bag, send me a comment below and tell me your favorite image from the blogs, I will put your name in my cool, red Disneyland hat and randomly pick a winner on Friday night at 9:00 P.M. PST. With the help of grumpy cat, Scott Hastings.

Scott Hastings

Scott Hastings

Enjoy!

P.S. Of course all of you faithful blog subscribers are welcome to enter the drawing – as you know I have never offered a free prize before!!! So stingy!


Marvelous Margaret strikes again!

Marvelous Margaret Linderman

Marvelous Margaret Linderman

I am supposed to be cleaning my sewing room, so I will blog instead!  It is much more fun…

Yesterday I went to a really fun class held at Woodengate Quilts with inspiring teacher and friend Margaret Linderman.

We made napkins in two different styles.  Of course, being the nutball I am, I had to pre-cut all my fabrics and then proceed to make two thousand and two napkins.  They look great!

There were square napkins with mitered corners…

Square napkins

Square napkins

Darling contrast fabrics

Darling contrast fabrics

Picnic, anyone?

Picnic, anyone?

I might have gone a little overboard!

How cute are these?

How cute are these?

The mitered corners are really easy to do and the project is really fabric-friendly.  A half yard of the inside fabric and 5/8 yard of the outside makes two napkins.  The directions can be found in several sources, but I know that another wonderful teacher, Laura Nownes, has pictorial directions on her blog. You can find them at: http://seehowwesew.wordpress.com/2011/05/03/ahh-sweet-spring/

Of course, Margaret had a special project up her sleeve.  She showed us how to make these cool, sort-of-half-circle-two-sided napkins…

Half circle napkin

Half circle napkin

Pretty contrast fabric and darling stitching

Pretty contrast fabric and darling stitching

You stitch and flip and topstitch and then…

Folds up into little trees!

Folds up into little trees!

They fold all cleverly up into little trees. I just love them. I made four napkins using this Art Gallery fabric to give as a gift to a special friend. They also look good in Christmas fabrics – just like little Christmas trees.

Between you and me, I don’t actually need to take a class, but the beauty of doing so is that you actually get your work done. You also see friends, get out of the house, and you always learn new things from your fellow students. One of the other students showed us how to use a threaded needle to pull out the corners; it works really well.

Besides all that, any chance to spend time with an amazing teacher like Margaret is just golden. Get out there and take a class! It’s fun!

Being a person who has to make absolutely everything out of fabric, I try to make gifts out of fabric for my friends and family.  Often I get a project organized but then get too busy to make them and end up not having gifts for anyone. Oops! Now I have the gift for this year organized, I will be making them for everyone I know… if they are lucky!

Special note for you blog subscribers: What do you think of my photos from the new “photo booth,” my bathtub?  Better color, eh?  No yellow wall in there!


Quilt Show – Margaret Linderman textile artist!

The Wonderful and Talented Margaret Linderman

The Wonderful and Talented Margaret Linderman

Master textile artist and quilter Margaret Linderman was the featured artist at the recent “Spring on the Straits” Quilt Show put on by the Carquinez Strait Stitchers in Benicia, California.

And the address is...

And the address is...

The show was held in a building called the Clocktower, which was a giant old brick structure, perhaps once used to store munitions.

I was very taken with the amazing entry door.

Clocktower door

Clocktower door

The show was upstairs in a very wonderful room filled with quilts and vendors.

Close up of a quilt on Margaret's table

Close up of a quilt on Margaret's table

Margaret had many of her wearable art pieces on display at the back of the room, and many lucky quilters got to see her demonstrate the process she uses to create them as the weekend progressed.

A collection of Margaret's garments

A collection of Margaret's garments

The show featured many of the garments made with ethnic fabrics.

Detail of the back of a coat called "Day of the Dead Through the Eyes of the Soul"

Detail of the back of a coat called "Day of the Dead Through the Eyes of the Soul"

An important part of Margaret’s creative team is her wonderful daughter Janis Stob.

Janis Stob from DeJanis Stob from December's Child in from of "An Homage to the Ballet Folklorico of Mexico" coatcember's Child

Janis Stob Janis Stob from December's Child in from of "An Homage to the Ballet Folklorico of Mexico" coat from December's Child

I regret to say that there were more jackets and outfits there that I somehow didn’t photograph.  Note to self – pay attention!  I think I was distracted by that pesky Mavis Quinn.

Behind the work table, one of Margaret’s newest quilts, Floral Fiesta was hanging.  I was entranced!

Floral Fiesta quilt

Floral Fiesta quilt

This is a quilt that you have to see in person to really appreciate.  The border has 10+ yards of applique flowers around it.  Hundreds of flowers all stitched in many colors.  The whole edge is triple stitched over a cording.  It is Amazing!

Janis in front of "Floral Fiesta"

Janis in front of "Floral Fiesta"

Margaret also had many of her quilts on display, but Mavis stole my camera and deleted all my other photos!  See what I have to put up with!  This was a show that was not to be missed!

Margaret Linderman wearing "View from the Koi Garden"

Margaret Linderman wearing "View from the Koi Garden"


Dream Chair Corral – Frida Chair

Frida Chair by Margaret Linderman

Frida Chair by Margaret Linderman

Margaret Linderman is a fabulous fiber artist.  She specializes in collage-style, quilted, clothing and quilts, made with spectacular ethnic fabrics.  Her Frida Chair is one of the most wonderful chair quilts I have seen.

Margaret is a devotee of Frida Kahlo and she has a whole room in her home that is inspired by the late Mexican artist.  I have delighted in seeing the quilts, curtains, Day of the Dead altera fiber art pieces, and now the chair, that go into this wonderful room.

Margaret is a master of the raw edge appliqué and her cut out flowers and collage style is one of my most important influences.  I know that the Love and Thorns Loveseat, Chica Chair and Barb Wire Betsy would have never been created if it weren’t for Margaret’s inspired work.

One of the amazing things to note is that Margaret and her talented daughter, Janis Stob, teach at Wooden Gate Quilts several days a week and anyone can go to the drop-in classes that they teach and be in a wonderful, creative environment.  I cannot emphasize how much inspiration a positive teaching situation can be for quilters of every level!

I was lucky to have Margaret attend my first ever Dream Chair Quilt class when she started this piece.  She had this amazing cloudy sky fabric, which called out to be a background for a chair!  A large-scale flower chair back and two different border sides added to the magic and mystery of this quilt.

Frida Chair - right side detail

Frida Chair - right side detail

The Frida Chair has a large appliqué of Frida surrounded by flowers.  She floats in the sunset, serene and fierce!

Frida Chair - right head rest

Frida Chair - right head rest

A little bird perches on the headrest, keeping an eye on the amazing lady.

Frida Chair - seat detail

Frida Chair - seat detail

Seated on the chair is a little swaddled baby, and Margaret calls him Baby Diego after Frida’s husband Diego Rivera.  The fabrics on the front of the cushion and in the thick, textural piping are woven fabrics from Guatemala. The central flower on the back of the chair’s seat is embellished with tiny yellow beads and a large jewel in the center that is representative of Diego’s all-seeing third eye from a Frida Kahlo painting.

Frida Chair - foot detail

Frida Chair - foot detail

Each little touch, including the smiling skull feet, fills me with such delight.

Margaret’s has been working very hard and her amazing wearable art will be featured in the Benicia Carquinez Straits Quilt Guild show on April 30 and May 1, 2011.  It is a not-to-be-missed opportunity!

Read about it here and see the schedule of Margaret’s demonstrations!

http://www.beniciamagazine.com/Blogs/Happenings/April-2011/Strait-Stitching/

Remember that you can click on any of these images to examine them more closely.

Frida Chair - chair close up

Frida Chair - chair close up


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